PlantWild: Building a pond or bog garden

      

Plants for your pond

Ponds are a major source of wildlife and no matter what size you can build in your garden; adding a pond or wet area can create an amazing wildlife habitat.

After building and planting, the pond will quickly attract all sorts of wildlife, including birds, insects in many shapes and forms, mammals and amphibians. The pond feature will constantly change with the seasons and with time; not only will it offer an interesting and valuable habitat for wildlife, but it will look great too.

We suggest preparing the wetland and pond area in Autumn or Winter and planting in May although plants can be added at any time. Below is a selection of PlantWild native plants we can supply for including in your pond feature:

Marginals – on the edge

Yellow iris –  Iris pseudacorusa destination plant for dragonflies, damselflies and especially bees (use in larger ponds)

Marsh marigold -Caltha palustris – the bright yellow flowers attract bees and the dense growth is great shelter for frogs

Bogbean – Menyanthes trifoliata – loved by bees and adult moths

Ragged robin – Lychnis flos-cuculi – a nectar source for bees and butterflies

Meadowsweet- Filipendula ulmaria – a popular plant for pollinators including bees, butterflies, dragonflies, and even ladybirds

 

Emergent – planted below water level with the stems, leaves and flowers above water

Greater spearwort – Ranuncula lingua a launch pad for dragonfly nymphs and nectar source for bees

Purple loosestrife – Lythrum salicaria –  the striking purple flower spikes attract bees, hoverflies and butterflies including elephant hawk-moth

Branched bur-reed –Sparganium–  the tall stems are a perfect resting place for dragonflies

 

Underwater – submerged below the water

Water soldier- Stratiotes aloides – provides shelter for frogs, toads, insects, and crustaceans

 

Plants for your boggy area

If you prefer to plant a ‘boggy’ wildlife area rather than build a pond, you will also create an interesting area, fantastic for attracting wild life.

There are 2 main types of plants – those that prefer a damp area which is damp but well drained and those that will survive in wet, muddy conditions, so are still happy if the soil is permanently wet and waterlogged.

For a bog garden/ moist area plant 9 plants per 1m square, and below are some suggestions from the PlantWild catalogue:

Damp bog garden

Cowslip- Primula veris – an early nectar source for butterflies

Water avens – Geum rivale – provides shelter for amphibians whilst attracting bees and hoverflies

Meadowsweet – Filipendula ulmaria – a popular plant for pollinators including bees, butterflies, dragonflies, and even ladybirds

Marsh marigold – Caltha palustris – the bright yellow flowers attract bees and the dense growth is great shelter for frogs

Globeflower – Trollius europaeusa pollen source for chiastocheta flies (which only feed
on globeflower), micromoths and bumblebees.

Hemp agrimony Eupatorium cannabinum – attracts bees, butterflies and hoverflies

Ragged robin Lychnis flos-cuculi –  a nectar source for bees and butterflies

Devils bit Scabious – Succisa pratensis – an attraction for a wide selection of bees and butterflies, including the Marsh Fritillary butterfly

Muddy bog garden

Bogbean – Menyanthes trifoliata – loved by bees and adult moths

Yellow Iris – Iris pseudacorus – a destination plant for dragonflies, damselflies and especially bees

Purple Loosestrife Lythrum salicaria – the striking purple flower spikes attract bees, hoverflies and butterflies including elephant hawk-moth

Water mint Mentha aquatic – attracts butterflies for nectar; dragonfly and damselfly. However, it is very invasive so best planted in a container

Marsh marigold Caltha palustris – the bright yellow flowers attract bees and the dense growth is great shelter for frogs